FLORIDA POLITICS: Daniella Levine Cava team says negative mailers are ‘full of lies and misinformation’

Miami-Dade mayoral candidate Daniella Levine Cava is pushing back against a negative mailer attacking her record while on the Miami-Dade County Commission.

The mailers dropped last month. At the time, her team blamed supporters of two of her opponents in the mayoral race. On Thursday, Senior Advisor Christian Ulvert focused on one.

“All indications continue to show that it’s being backed by similar interests that have donated to one of our main opponents, former Mayor Alex Penelas,” he argued.

“We all know that they’re full of lies and misinformation.”

To be clear, there’s no direct involvement from Penelas. Instead, the Levine Cava campaign has pointed to a chain of donations showing the groupsbehind the mailers — True Progressive LLC — is connected to donors who have supported the Penelas and Esteban Bovo campaigns.

The Penelas campaign has denied any connection.

“Commissioner Levine Cava knows that the Penelas campaign and Bold Vision Committee have nothing to do with the mailers that were distributed,” a Penelas spokesperson said.

“This is an effort to shamelessly portray herself as a victim and raise money for her campaign. The ultimate hypocrisy is that she attempts to defend herself against claims she says are false by trying to discredit Alex Penelas and his record of accomplishment, which will always stand head and shoulders above hers. As someone who wants to be Mayor, Commissioner Levine Cava should hold herself to higher standard.”

The mailer attacks Levine Cava for failing to support “critical funding to help with affordable housing [and] rental assistance” during her time representing District 8 on the Commission. It also points to her private wealth, much of which she earned before joining local government.

“She is an out of touch elitist who has gotten rich while serving on the County Commission,” the mailer says. “Levine Cava’s net worth has skyrocketed, nearly doubling to $8.5 million. She even supported raising her own pay to $100,000. While we lose vital services and get taxed, Levine Cava gets rich!”

During Thursday’s call, Levine Cava supporters such as Sen. Oscar Braynon II and Annette Taddeo and Miami-Dade Commissioner Jean Monestime pushed back against the mailer’s claims.

“She’s been a colleague, she’s been a friend and she’s been a champion for the most vulnerable,” Monestime said. He endorsed Levine Cava earlier this week.

Taddeo also doubted the mailer would have much of an impact in the race.

“You know why it doesn’t work? Because we know Daniella. We know she’s a progressive champion. We know she’s someone who has been there for the community. We know that she truly cares.”

According to records, True Progressives LLC was established with the same address as originally used by Twenty-Two Metrics LLC, an organization run by Alex Alvarado. Twenty-Two Metrics has since swapped its principal address.

Twenty-Two Metrics has also received $45,000 from an organization called Floridians for Economic Advancement. That group has also funneled $1,000 to the Bovo campaign.

Another organization, Floridians for a Stronger Democracy, has sent more than $200,000 to Floridians for Economic Advancement. Floridians for a Stronger Democracy has also donated $10,000 to Bovo’s PC and $30,000 to Penelas’ PC.

Levine Cava’s team is using that money chain to assert her opponents bear some responsibility for the mailers.

Supporters such as Braynon are undeterred.

“I am very excited, fired up and ready to get out there and work and make sure that we have the catalyst for change in 2020,” he said.

Levine Cava is competing in the seven-person field against Carlos Antonio De Armas, entrepreneur Monique Nicole Barley, County Commissioners Bovo and Xavier Suarez, real estate agent Ludmilla Domond and former County Mayor Penelas.

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NBC MIAMI: Despite ‘Loophole,’ Commissioner Commits to Resign Her Seat Win Or Lose Mayor’s Race

Miami-Dade County Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava won’t officially leave her District 8 seat until she knows whether or not she won the county mayor’s race.

Cava has told NBC 6 she will not try to keep her seat if she loses the countywide race. This comes in response to critics pointing to a “loophole” in the “resign to run” law forcing either a costly special election or a controversial appointment.

“I do not plan to seek that seat so I want to dispel rumors right here. I have served proudly as county commissioner. I plan to be the next mayor of Miami-Dade County. I am not planning to complete the term as county commissioner,” Levine Cava said in a recent interview with NBC 6. “Nor will I seek appointment.”

The date she picked for her resignation to become official could cost the county hundreds of thousands of dollars.

State law requires elected officials to resign their current position when seeking another. After Levine Cava turned in her resignation notice to the county, several candidates began to campaign for her soon-to-be vacated seat, thinking the election for District 8 would be Aug. 18, along with other county races. They were mistaken.

A legal memo obtained by NBC 6 between Levine Cava and the Miami-Dade County Attorney Abigail Price-Williams lays out the next steps.

Levine Cava followed the “resign to run” law. The seat is vacant “upon the effective date of the resignation” submitted by Levine Cava – so that will be Nov. 16.

After Nov. 16, according to the memo, the Board of County Commissioners can appoint someone to fill the seat within 30 days or call for a special election within 90 days; setting up a likely February election.

Suzy Trutie, the Deputy Supervisor of Elections for Miami-Dade County, confirmed to NBC 6 that a special election for District 8 would cost the county $450,000. Another $450,000 will be required if there’s no majority winner in that election and a runoff is needed.

The county has strict time tables for elections. If Commissioner Levine Cava resigned effective early in 2020, the county board could have tried to time the election to be on August 18th. If the process was delayed, it could have been an earlier special election.

“It’s important to me for this district to be represented as long as possible,” Levine Cava said in response. “We have a lot of things pending before the commission and my district constituents. I want to do my best to represent my constituents as long as I am able.”

Palmetto Bay Vice Mayor John Bubois, who was raising money and campaigning for the commissioner’s seat, told NBC 6 that Levine Cava, “played the system for her own personal benefit.”

He said that since the coronavirus pandemic began, most of the work done at the county has been through Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s office through executive order.

“The Commission has done very little to nothing as far as I’m concerned,” Dubois said.

Daniella Cohen Higgins, Leonard Duran Buike, and Hammocks Citizens Advisory Committee Vice Chair Alicia Arellano also began campaigning thinking the election would be Aug. 18.

“Because I thought the election was going to be in August, I had mailings, I spent a lot of money on a website,” Duran Buike said.

What made political observers grumble is how rare the move by Levine Cava is.

Miami-Dade Commissioner Eileen Higgins recently won a special election after former Commissioner Bruno Barreiro resigned immediately from his position to run for Congress.

Resigning on or before the election was the norm before term limits became a reality this cycle.

Miami-Dade County politicians including Arthur Teele, Maurice Ferré, Alex Penelas, Joe Martinez, JD Morales, Miguel Diaz de la Portilla, and current Mayor Carlos Gimenez all resigned effective immediately or on election day to run for office.

Commissioner Joe Martinez, who represents District 11, said he will push for a resolution changing the county’s charter and plans on bringing it up at a board meeting in July.

His measure would amend the charter so when someone resigns to run for another office, the election to fill their seat will be timed with the August primary and the November general election. If the idea is approved by county voters this November, it would get rid of the need for the special election or appointment options.

“It would save county taxpayers a lot of money,” Martinez said.

Levine Cava supports Martinez’s measure, saying, “I do think we want to clean this up.”

Levine Cava will face Commissioner Steve Bovo, Commissioner Xavier Suarez, and former Miami-Dade Mayor Alex Penelas, Monique Nicole Barley, Carlos Antonio De Armas, and Ludmilla Domond in the Aug. 18 election for county mayor.

The top two will go on to November.

View the original article here.

FLORIDA POLITICS : Jean Monestime endorses fellow commissioner Daniella Levine Cava in Miami-Dade mayoral race

Miami-Dade Commissioner Jean Monestime is endorsing his colleague, Daniella Levine Cava, in the 2020 contest to be the next Mayor of Miami-Dade County.

“I have served with Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava for years and she has earned my trust and respect,” Monestime said.

“From the day she joined the dais, Daniella brought a sense of purpose and mission to deliver for our community with strong ethics and integrity. Our County needs a public servant who puts the people first and whose vision for a better Miami-Dade includes every resident and worker, and that candidate is my friend and colleague Daniella! She has a clear plan to deliver for our community and will be the voice our residents need.”

Monestime himself mounted a bid for the office after filing last fall. He withdrew his name from the running in April.

Commissioner Monestime isn’t the only new supporter for Levine Cava’s campaign. Former Chairman of the Public Health Trust Larry Handfield also says he’ll back Levine Cava in her bid to be Miami-Dade County’s first woman Mayor.

“With the many challenges we face today, we need a tried and tested leader to steer us through these tough times,” Handfield said.

“Daniella Levine Cava has been serving her community for forty years and has the experience, integrity and honesty that I we need in County Hall. Especially in the midst of this pandemic, we’re going to need someone who listens to medical professionals and puts facts and science above politics. That’s why Daniella has my vote and full endorsement to be Miami-Dade’s next Mayor.”

The two new backers are announcing their support just days after Levine Cava secured the coveted endorsement from the SEIU Florida.

“Both Jean and Larry have led our community with the vision necessary to lift up all communities in the face of racial and economic injustice,” Levine Cava added.

“Knowing that I can count on their wisdom and guidance each step of the way makes me confident we will move Miami-Dade forward and deliver the results our residents desperately need.”

Levine Cava is competing in the contest against Carlos Antonio De Armas, entrepreneur Monique Nicole Barley, current County Commissioners Esteban “Steve” Bovo and Xavier Suarez, real estate agent Ludmilla Domond and former County Mayor Alex Penelas.

Current Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giménez is term-limited, making the 2020 contest an open race. The mayoral election will take place alongside Florida’s primary elections on Aug. 18.

If no candidate receives a majority of the vote — a high likelihood in the seven-person field — a runoff between the top two candidates will be held during the Nov. 3 general election.

View the original article here.

FLORIDA POLITICS: SEIU Florida endorses Daniella Levine Cava in Miami-Dade County mayoral contest

The Florida chapter of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), one of the state’s largest unions, is endorsing Daniella Levine Cava in the 2020 race for Miami-Dade County Mayor.

Representatives from SEIU Florida announced their decision at a Friday morning news conference at Jackson Memorial Hospital.

“Daniella Levine Cava’s life’s work in the private and public sector proves she is that fighter and is unwavering in her commitment to stand alongside working families in their pursuit of a better life,” said registered nurse Martha Baker, president of SEIU Florida.

“Daniella embodies the core values SEIU members care deeply about and we are confident she will make us proud as our next — and first — Madame Mayor.”

The endorsement is seen as a big get in the seven-person field. The organization represents more than 55,000 active and retired workers in the state.

Levine Cava currently represents District 8 on the Miami-Dade County Commission.

“This is truly a humbling endorsement as it comes from the frontline workers who are literally on the line every day saving lives, delivering critical services to our community and fighting for what is right,” Levine Cava added.

“As Mayor, workers will have a seat at the decision-making table every day as we lead through this unprecedented moment. It’s time for everyday residents, working families, and our dedicated workers to have a true champion in County Hall and I promise to be that champion as Miami-Dade’s next County Mayor.”

Friday’s endorsement was somewhat telegraphed, as Levine Cava had recently added two endorsements from individual labor groups. In early June, the Communication Workers of America endorsed her bid. Earlier this week, she added support from the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades, District Council 78.

Levine Cava is competing in the contest against Carlos Antonio De Armas, entrepreneur Monique Nicole Barley, current County Commissioners Esteban “Steve” Bovo and Xavier Suarez, real estate agent Ludmilla Domond and former County Mayor Alex Penelas.

The contest is open, as Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giménez is facing term limits. Giménez is pursuing a congressional seat.

Friday’s news comes just after Penelas nabbed a set of six endorsements from current and former female elected officials in the region.

The Miami-Dade County mayoral election will take place alongside Florida’s primary elections on Aug. 18. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote — a high likelihood in the seven-person field — a runoff between the top two candidates will be held during the Nov. 3 general election.

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MIAMI HERALD: Levine Cava unfairly maligned in county mayor’s race

I am being bombarded with mailings from political cowards who identify themselves as “True Progressives.”

They are filled with lies about Miami-Dade Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava, a candidate for Miami-Dade mayor.

In the 1980s, when I was a member of the Miami-Dade School Board, Daniella often came before the board advocating for special-needs children. After 10 years with Legal Services, Guardian ad Litem and the Department of Children & Families, she founded the Human Services Coalition, now named Catalyst Miami, to empower low-income families with tools to help them lift themselves out of poverty.

Since she was elected to the County Commission in 2014, she has been a tireless advocate for children, families, women’s issues and effective government. With energy, wisdom, she cares for the well-being of all people. Daniella’s life is a model of integrity and true public service.

It is deplorable that those who will not identify themselves seek to malign this distinguished public servant.

Janet R. McAliley,

Miami

View the original article here.

FLORIDA POLITICS: Labor group backs Daniella Levine Cava for Miami-Dade County Mayor

The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT), District Council 78 is endorsing Miami-Dade County mayoral candidate Daniella Levine Cava. She’s one of seven candidates competing for that office.

Levine Cava currently represents District 8 on the Miami-Dade County Commission.

“As Commissioner, she has stood up for working families so we will continue to stand with her,” said J.C. Garcia, an IUPAT member.

“She is a proven leader who will take on the many challenges Miami-Dade is facing, and we are proud to support her historic campaign for County Mayor.”

The group joins the Communication Workers of America (CWA) in endorsing Levine Cava’s campaign.

“I’m proud to receive my second endorsement from labor groups supporting my vision,” Levine Cava said Tuesday.

“Working families know that I have been and will always be their advocate in local government, tackling the issues they care about. Our economy grows only when we treat our workers with the dignity and respect that they deserve — we must do more to expand access to healthcare, a living wage, and paid sick leave.

“With them standing behind me, I am more confident than ever that we’ll make history and elect me as the first female Mayor of Miami-Dade County.”

Levine Cava is competing in the contest against Carlos Antonio De Armas, entrepreneur Monique Nicole Barley, current County Commissioners Esteban “Steve” Bovo and Xavier Suarez, real estate agent Ludmilla Domond and former County Mayor Alex Penelas.

Current Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giménez is term-limited.

View the original article here.

MIAMI HERALD: Trump doesn’t rule out meeting with Venezuela’s Maduro. ‘I would maybe think about that’

President Donald Trump declined in a recent interview to rule out meeting with Venezuelan leader Nicolas Maduro, expressing openness to a presidential visit that would upend his administration’s hard-line policy toward the dictator.

Axios reported Sunday that when a reporter asked Trump if he would meet with Maduro, the president replied: “I would maybe think about that. … Maduro would like to meet. And I’m never opposed to meetings — you know, rarely opposed to meetings.”

Trump’s comments — including ambivalence toward his 2019 decision to recognize National Assembly head Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s interim president — came days after release of former security advisor John Bolton’s book describing Trump’s public toughness toward Maduro as an attempt to win Republican votes in South Florida.

The president’s Axios interview brought quick condemnation from Miami-Dade Democrats. “It is a sad day for the Venezuelan people, democracy and American leadership,” Rep. Donna Shalala, a Democrat representing a Miami-area district, said in a Twitter post about the Axios story. “I stand with Juan Guaido and the people of Venezuela.”

“This betrayal of the fight for democracy in Venezuela confirms that Trump’s rhetoric was false hope all along,” Florida Sen. José Javier Rodriguez, D-Miami, wrote on Twitter. “This is a slap in the face to our vibrant Venezuelan community,” Miami-Dade commissioner Daniella Levine Cava, a Democrat running in the non-partisan race for county mayor in 2020, said in a statement.

South Florida is the heart of Venezuela’s immigrant population in the United States, with more than 100,000 residents born in that country. That makes Trump’s anti-Maduro positions — including a brief flirtation with a U.S. invasion to depose the dictator — a potentially key factor in Florida, a state the president won by less than 2% in 2016.

Speaking at the United Nations ahead of the General Assembly on September 26, 218, President Trump said all U.S. options are on the table to help end the political, economic and humanitarian chaos in Venezuela. BY AP

In January, Miami-Dade’s County Commission unanimously passed a resolution endorsing the Trump administration’s decision to not recognize Maduro’s reelection the prior year.

The resolution quotes Bolton, who then held the position of Trump’s national security advisor. Guaidó traveled to Miami in February and was treated as Venezuela’s leader by local elected officials. Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez refers to him as “Interim President,” and Guaidó’s wife as Venezuela’s first lady after welcoming Fabiana Rosales to his County Hall offices in March.

Gimenez, a Republican running for Congress with Trump’s endorsement, urged Trump “to adhere to the current administration policy toward Venezuela” and called Maduro “a liar who does not respect the dignity of his own citizens.” Gimenez said “diplomatic meetings with him will do nothing to the help the Venezuelan people.”

The freshman Democrat Gimenez hopes to unseat in Florida’s 26th District, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, issued a statement saying Trump’s interview “clearly shows his complete disregard for freedom and undermines the gains made by the legitimate President of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó.”

A spokesman for U.S. Sen. Rick Scott, a Republican from Naples, said Scott doesn’t want Trump to change positions on turning down past Maduro meeting requests. “No, Senator Scott does not believe President Trump should meet with Maduro — a ruthless thug and dictator that is committing genocide against his people,” Scott spokesman Chris Hartline told the Miami Herald.

View the original article here.

FLORIDA POLITICS: Direct mail round-up: Daniella Levine Cava decries mailer questioning her progressive bona fides

The Daniella Levine Cava campaign is pushing back after a negative mailer attacked Levine Cava as “not progressive.”

Levine Cava is one of seven candidates competing in the Miami-Dade County mayoral contest. A group called “True Progressives LLC” was behind the attack piece.

“Housing is more than just having a roof over our heads,” the mailer reads. “Yet, Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava cut critical funding to help with affordable housing [and] rental assistance.”

The flip side of the mailer continues its jabs at Daniella Levine Cava, who currently represents District 8 on the Miami-Dade County Commission.

“Daniella Levine Cava has turned her back on us!” the mailer exclaims.

“She is an out of touch elitist who has gotten rich while serving on the County Commission. Levine Cava’s net worth has skyrocketed, nearly doubling to $8.5 million. She even supported raising her own pay to $100,000. While we lose vital services and get taxed, Levine Cava gets rich!”

Levine Cava entered her Miami-Dade Commission race with substantial wealth while running the nonprofit organization Catalyst Miami. The proposed pay raise for commissioners would bring their salaries in line with commissioners from Broward and Palm Beach counties.

Levine Cava’s campaign pushed back against the claims regarding affordable housing. It’s unclear which vote the mailer is referring to. Levine Cava has pushed for affordable housing initiatives in the past.

The Levine Cava team pointed fingers at two of her opponents in the mayoral contest over the mailer’s release.

“This past weekend a special-interest dark money PAC launched a series of false mailers against Daniella Levine Cava,” said Scott Arceneaux, a senior advisor to the Levine Cava campaign.

“The PAC is being fueled by the same special interests behind Steve Bovo and Alex Penelas‘ campaigns. It’s clear their work is to undermine Democratic voters with the so-called True Progressives LLC and spread lies and misinformation about Daniella’s proven record of leadership in the community.”

According to records, True Progressives LLC was established with the same address as originally used by Twenty-Two Metrics LLC, an organization run by Alex Alvarado. Twenty-Two Metrics has since swapped its principal address.

Twenty-Two Metrics has also received $45,000 from an organization called Floridians for Economic Advancement. That group has also funneled $1,000 to the Bovo campaign.

Another organization, Floridians for a Stronger Democracy, has sent more than $200,000 to Floridians for Economic Advancement. Floridians for a Stronger Democracy has also donated $10,000 to Bovo’s PC and $30,000 to Penelas’ PC.

Levine Cava’s team is using that money chain to assert her opponents bear some responsibility for the mailers.

“Daniella’s experience and record is widely regarded and lauded; the same cannot be said of Mr. Penelas’ turbulent record as Mayor and Mr. Bovo’s record against residents,” Arceneaux added.

The Penelas campaign, however, denied any connection to the mailer’s release.

“Commissioner Levine Cava knows that the Penelas campaign and Bold Vision Committee have nothing to do with the mailers that were distributed,” a campaign spokesperson said.

“This is an effort to shamelessly portray herself as a victim and raise money for her campaign. The ultimate hypocrisy is that she attempts to defend herself against claims she says are false by trying to discredit Alex Penelas and his record of accomplishment, which will always stand head and shoulders above hers. As someone who wants to be Mayor, Commissioner Levine Cava should hold herself to higher standard.”

Florida Politics has also reached out to the Bovo campaign but has not received a reply.

View the original article here.

MIAMI HERALD: FPL drops plan to use treated sewage in nuke plant cooling canals. Critics still concerned

Florida Power & Light has abandoned a plan to use treated wastewater to freshen the troubled cooling canal system at its Turkey Point nuclear plant, striking at least one concern off a list of environmental issues surrounding the facility along south Biscayne Bay.

Instead, FPL intends to use the wastewater to cool a natural gas-fired unit that currently draws from the Floridan aquifer. That aquifer water, if state environmental regulators agree, would then be redirected to the cooling canals instead.

The new agreement between Miami-Dade County and FPL was approved at a County Commission meeting this week after years of discussions around ways to clean up and reduce salinity of the canals, which have been leaking into groundwater and creating an underground saltwater plume that threatens surrounding drinking water wells and adjacent Biscayne Bay.

The reclaimed water agreement will also help the county meet a 2025 state deadline requiring it to stop dumping sewage offshore and to reuse 60 percent of its wastewater. Environmentalists were concerned an original proposal to dump wastewater into the cooling canal system would have made things worse.

“It’s a huge win for the county, for the City of Miami, for the state, and obviously for the environment,” Eric Silagy, the company’s CEO, said in an interview with the Herald.

Under the plan, up to 15 million gallons per day of reclaimed wastewater will be piped to Turkey Point, where it will be treated at a plant FPL will build to make it suitable for use in the natural gas unit’s cooling towers.

The county will pay FPL $6.5 million per year through 2053, the length of the current agreement, to support the project. The new sewage treatment facility is scheduled to be operational in 2026, according to the plan. While the county is expected to make a total of $182 million in payments, FPL will invest an estimated $300 million in building and operating the project, the agreement says.

Still, the plan disappointed some environmental advocates and county commissioners because it will treat less sewage than originally proposed and will use water that might have been diverted — after high level of treatment — to recharge the Biscayne Aquifer and restore water flow and quality to Biscayne Bay and wetlands.

“It is really disappointing because we had a very ambitious plan and one that would have used much more of the reuse and it would have really helped us environmentally with the restoration of the wetlands, so I’m hoping that we can continue to revisit these larger issues of the reuse plan including opportunities to recharge the aquifer and the basin,” Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava said at the June 16 meeting before voting to approve the item.

Mayor Carlos Gimenez called the new plan a step forward and said a provision was added to the agreement to allow for the expansion of the wastewater treatment plant to 30 million gallons a day.

“I wish we had more, but one of my favorite sayings is never let perfect be the enemy of good, and this is good,” he said.

Environmentalists called the agreement a missed opportunity to do more for South Florida’s environment.

While it’s good that wastewater won’t go into the unlined cooling canals and potentially leak into Biscayne Bay, water quality advocates were hoping the county would use this project to address other pollution issues and put Turkey Point on track to fixing its troubled canals system once and for all.

They also said the water reuse project ignores a 20-year-old Everglades restoration plan to use wastewater to revive the bay and coastal wetlands, which stalled over the high price of treatment.

FPL said it would cost too much to treat the wastewater enough to meet Biscayne Bay’s rigorous requirements at this point, but that the plant can be scaled up in the future.

“The way I see it is this is an opportunity to prove our technology; maybe we will be able to do more in the future,” Silagy said. “We’re always been open to that and happy to do it.”

Controversy has plagued Turkey Point’s cooling system for over a decade. The cooling method that funnels water through a 5,900-acre series of canals stretching along Biscayne Bay is unique; all other nuclear plants in the country use cooling towers, which can better contain the water that’s circulating.

FPL has long argued that the canals constituted a closed-loop cooling system, built to prevent high-temperature discharges from harming Biscayne Bay. But studies have showed that the unlined canals, built on top of porous limestone, are leaking polluted water into the bay, contaminating the drinking water supply and harming the surrounding ecosystem.

In addition to the underground salt water plume that continues to move west, FPL has also struggled with hot temperatures in the cooling canal system after the company completed a massive multimillion-dollar overhaul to boost power coming from the reactors. The hotter and increasingly saltier canals triggered algae blooms, threatened to shut down the reactors, and forced FPL to scramble to look for water to cool and freshen the system.

The issues led state and county regulators to cite FPL for polluting the waters in Biscayne Bay; they ordered the company to come up with a plan to clean up its operations.

Environmentalists said that FPL should resolve these issues before getting any new deals with the county, such as the wastewater use agreement.

“At a minimum FPL should take steps to mitigate existing environmental impacts and better prepare for those to come, such as sea level rise,” said Rachel Silverstein, executive director at Miami Waterkeeper.

View the original article here.